Why you should always password protect your smartphone

I recently moved to Los Angeles with my girlfriend, and my parents visited this weekend. Over dinner we discussed the California Supreme Court ruling which held that police officers don’t need a warrant to lawfully search mobile phones of arrestees.

All four of us own a smartphone, but I was the only one who encrypted password protected mine. So I obnoxiously brandished my Android device to demonstrate how easy it is to swipe a simple pattern to turn the phone on.

My girlfriend, a UCLA MBA candidate, scoffed that it was inefficient and not worth her time. But I countered that the split-second motion quickly becomes effortless. On the other end, my parents thought they had nothing to hide. (Have I taught these people nothing!?)

For the more cynical among us, Ryan Radia at the Ars Technica blog presents a thorough analysis of the relevant court cases impacting your smartphone privacy rights. He also lays out simple strategies that can protect your mobile device from police searches, even if you’re under arrest.

His tips should be common sense to Flex Your Rights fans.

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Flex DVDs are a perfect Christmas gift

This is the first holiday season since the release of 10 Rules for Dealing with Police. So if you’ve got friends and family who haven’t seen it yet, now’s a perfect time to make sure they do.



To ensure that your DVDs arrive in time for Christmas, please order by this Friday the 17th. (If you want to send a gift DVD to someone else, simply enter a separate shipping address.)



Your order not only helps your loved ones protect their constitutional rights — it makes it possible for Flex Your Rights to continue our public education work. 10 Rules has earned major media hits and created new partnerships that allow us to educate more people than ever before. Our YouTube page, for example, has reached 8 million views!

As a small organization with a modest operating budget, your support really goes a long way towards making our work possible. So please click here to place a DVD order or to make a small or large tax-deductible donation. You may also send a check donation (made out to Flex Your Rights) to P.O. Box 21497, Washington, DC 20009.

Thanks to you, 2010 has been Flex Your Rights’ best year yet! I think you’ll love what we’ve got in store for 2011.

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Huffington Post Features 10 Rules for Dealing with Police

In case you haven’t seen it yet, Flex board of advisors member and LEAP Executive Director Neill Franklin had a terrific piece in the Huffington Post last week  discussing the proper way to handle police encounters.

 Here are some choice bits.

What few people understand, but police know all too well, is that your constitutional rights only apply if you understand and assert them. Unless they have strong evidence (i.e. probable cause) police need your permission to search your belongings or enter your home. The instant you grant them permission to invade your privacy, many of your legal protections go out the window and you’re left on the hook for anything illegal the police find, as well as any damage they cause in the process.

Of course, even if you know your basic rights, police officers are trained to shake your confidence. If you refuse a search, I might respond by threatening to call in a drug-sniffing dog and sternly reminding you that things will go much easier if you cooperate. Creating a sense of hopelessness for the suspect enables us to break down their defenses and gain compliance. In the film, we show several variations on these common threats, but the main lesson is that it doesn’t matter what the officer says; you still have to remain calm and protect your rights.

Luckily for us, Neill’s article became a big hit around the web, bringing in a flood of orders and emails from folks who hadn’t heard about Flex Your Rights before.

 

 

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Meet Chief Ken Burton: Police Leadership at Its Finest

In our last alert I mentioned that Columbia, MO police Chief Ken Burton has been using 10 Rules for Dealing with Police to educate the public about constitutional rights.

Now you can listen to Chief Burton describe in his own words how Flex Your Rights’ educational message aligns with his policing philosophy.

I also recently participated in an NPR affiliate interview with Chief Burton and policing expert David A. Harris. It’s an in-depth look at problems in modern policing — including some great discussion of SWAT raids, police accountability, racial profiling, and the importance of know-your-rights education.

Watch the streaming video of the interview here.

We’ve come a long way since our first video was released on VHS tape. What began as an effort to educate activists is now influencing entire police departments to be mindful of citizens’ constitutional rights.

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Flex Gets Great Response at NAACP Nat’l Conf.

Last week I presented 10 Rules for Dealing with Police at the NAACP National Conference. The panel hosted by NAACP’s Criminal Justice Program was focused on youth and the criminal justice system.

The 200-member audience was mostly high school and college-aged, and I couldn’t have hoped for a better reception. The video got an enthusiastic round of applause. More importantly, everyone stayed for the Q&A, which went beyond the allotted hour.

Before the screening, I asked if anyone had received any kind of know-your-rights training. Only a handful raised their hands. But afterward, their new knowledge inspired sophisticated questions covering Miranda rights, PATRIOT Act, videotaping police and more.

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Awesome Police Dept. Teaches Citizens to Flex Their Rights

You and I are well-trained to refuse certain police requests. But when I was approached by Columbia, MO Police Chief Ken Burton the other month, I was happy to consent.

The Chief called to ask my permission to use 10 Rules for Dealing with Police as part of a department-backed public education campaign to inform the public of their rights. Enthusiastically, I said yes.

Within weeks, a new report was released showing that in 2009 black motorists in Columbia were 127% more likely to be stopped than white motorists. At a public forum hosted by NAACP and other groups concerned about racial profiling, Chief Burton put 10 Rules to work.

The Columbia Daily Tribune editorialized in favor of the event, specifically citing 10 Rules.

State NAACP President Mary Ratliff called the video “a powerful teaching tool for both sides” and urged its wide distribution.

This is quite a coming-together. Ratliff has been critical of police in their confrontations with black people, and police have defended themselves in standoffs typically without a mutually agreeable resolution. The video gives both sides a way to communicate outside the context of a traumatic incident and might help subjects avoid trouble with the police.

The police department deserves credit for taking action to bridge the understanding gap, and Ratliff deserves similar credit for responding positively. This is a big deal, and I commend both parties.

Let’s follow Chief Burton and Mary Ratliff’s lead! If you or someone you know has a friendly relationship with your local police chief, why not give them a 10 Rules DVD a copy of the Daily Tribune editorial?

Let’s create hundreds of police-led screenings across the country!

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Arizona & Reasonable Suspicion

Defenders of the strict new immigration law claim that the law’s reasonable suspicion requirement will prevent abuses. This argument gives Cato Institute scholar and Flex Board of Advisors member Tim Lynch his own reasons to be suspicious.

The police are going to ask questions and request to see papers in a variety of circumstances — whether they have reasonable suspicion or not. From a legal, constitutional, and practical perspective, the key issue is this: What are the consequences, if any, for the person who stands his ground and declines to answer questions or declines to produce identification papers? If a person declines, will the police back off and say, “Well, that is your right, sir, you may go” or will the police escalate the situation by ordering the person to answer questions, ordering the production of identification, detaining the person, or threaten the person with arrest on bogus charges?

Lynch digs deeper into the practical dilemma faced by laypeople attempting to Flex their rights.

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10 Rules DVD Release Delay & DC Premiere Cancelation

There’s no sugar-coating this, but the 10 Rules for Dealing with Police DVD won’t be ready for the previously-announced February 12th release date. I know this is the second release date I’ve blown, and I apologize. Again. 

Regardless, I will keep my commitment to get the new DVD into your hands ASAP. While I’m hesitant to announce another specific release date — I expect to ship 10 Rules DVDs by late February or early March.

In the meantime, I offer a full order refund and cancellation to anyone who requests it. And for those of you who’ve already announced a 10 Rules screening event for February or early March, please email me your announcement. I can burn a pre-release DVD and ship it to you in time for your event at no additional cost to you.

For those of you planning to attend the 10 Rules DC screening premiere at the Cato Institute — or watch the live webcast — the event has been cancelled due to The Mid-Atlantic Snowpocalypse. The event will be rescheduled, and I’ll keep you posted.

Again, I sincerely apologize for any inconvenience I’ve caused you.

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